subtilitas:

FT Architects - Archery and Boxing facilities, Tokyo 2013. Each timber structure, while similar in scale, materiality, and design concept, is given a different treatment based on the activity within. The timber roof of the archery range is light, delicately detailed, and set against a black back-drop, referencing the proportions and precision of the archer’s arrows. The boxing studio has a stacked timber roof that is heavy, aggressive, and detailed with over-sized bolts, creating a visual movement akin to the physical contact of the boxing match. The exterior continues the theme; the light brown stain on the archery studio responds to the materials of the bow and arrow, while the more concrete finish of the boxing ring feels more grounded. Via.

(via spatula)

damadesign:

Harvard sounds beautiful today #honk

damadesign:

Harvard sounds beautiful today #honk

ryanpanos:

Île-De-Reve | Neda Vent Fischer

allthethingswelove:

Residents of Almaty, Kazakhstan, celebrate the Epiphany. January 2013. (via Artifacts: Photographer Ikuru Kuwajima – PROOF)

allthethingswelove:

Residents of Almaty, Kazakhstan, celebrate the Epiphany. January 2013. (via Artifacts: Photographer Ikuru Kuwajima – PROOF)

(Source: 500px.com, via sweethomestyle)

wnycradiolab:

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Moscow Metro, 1980
Here’s a beautiful map of the Moscow Metro from 1980 that’s unlike anything else I’ve ever seen. I don’t think it’s an official map, as it looks quite different to other Moscow maps of the same vintage. The archive I found the map in also lists it as “Source Unknown”. It appears to have been printed on the flyleaf of a pocket-sized book, bound to the book’s front cover on the left half, with the fold just to the right of the vertical Orange Line of the map.
Have we been there? No.
What we like: One of the most unique-looking transit maps I’ve ever seen. It looks more like a map of the solar system, with Jupiter-sized interchange stations within the orbit of the Ring Line, smaller satellites (outlying stations) trailing along in their wake. Despite the unusual form, and the renowned complexity of the Moscow system, this still has a nice sense of clarity, simplicity and order to it - this map is still very usable.
What we don’t like: Some absolutely terrible registration on the printing (which appears to be all spot colours - nine different colours in total!). Some fairly crude-looking linework, which may be poor draftsmanship or the result of the printing.
Our rating: Totally unique, but still a very usable map. Four stars.
(Source: Lebedev Studio’s historical archives of Moscow Metro maps)

Love this.

wnycradiolab:

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Moscow Metro, 1980

Here’s a beautiful map of the Moscow Metro from 1980 that’s unlike anything else I’ve ever seen. I don’t think it’s an official map, as it looks quite different to other Moscow maps of the same vintage. The archive I found the map in also lists it as “Source Unknown”. It appears to have been printed on the flyleaf of a pocket-sized book, bound to the book’s front cover on the left half, with the fold just to the right of the vertical Orange Line of the map.

Have we been there? No.

What we like: One of the most unique-looking transit maps I’ve ever seen. It looks more like a map of the solar system, with Jupiter-sized interchange stations within the orbit of the Ring Line, smaller satellites (outlying stations) trailing along in their wake. Despite the unusual form, and the renowned complexity of the Moscow system, this still has a nice sense of clarity, simplicity and order to it - this map is still very usable.

What we don’t like: Some absolutely terrible registration on the printing (which appears to be all spot colours - nine different colours in total!). Some fairly crude-looking linework, which may be poor draftsmanship or the result of the printing.

Our rating: Totally unique, but still a very usable map. Four stars.

(Source: Lebedev Studio’s historical archives of Moscow Metro maps)

Love this.

subtilitas:

Jun Aoki - J house, Tokyo 2007. Photos (C) Daici Ono. 

(via architecturemas)

art21:

“I’m not trying to spell out a story. I still think you feel the painting, and the reason you read the mark is because you also feel the mark.”
—Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

This scene is featured in the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 5 episode, Systems (2009).

WATCH: Julie Mehretu in Systems [available in the U.S. only] | Additional videos

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 5 episode, Systems, 2009. © Art21, Inc. 2009.

(via blackcontemporaryart)

ryanpanos:

Red Apple Apartment Building / Aedes Studio via Archdaily

disappearing act

(Source: allmeineliebe, via themadeshop)